“Granite” and Plywood Countertop Redo – CHEAP

So, we have had some unfortunate luck with our home the past few months (water leaks and discovering old damage in three different areas in our home). We’ve kind of unintentionally been thrown into a full blown remodel. We have gutted one side of our kitchen, rebuilt our laundry “room” (aka closet), gutted and remodeled our hall bathroom, remodeled our master bedroom and more. It’s been a bit of a mess around here to say the least… Simply put, construction zones and toddlers are an interesting mix. Not to mention, I was nine-months pregnant and hit full blown nesting mode in the middle of said construction zone.*

***Somewhere between the kitchen’s completion and the demo-day to the bathroom, Baby Girl made her grand appearance a week early. 

 

When we moved in, and up until our remodel, the counters were a dingy cream color. They had burn marks, knife cuts, and mystery stains that even the toughest bleach scrubbin’ couldn’t fix. I’ve been wanting to attempt painting over them for a while but have been scared to try and ruin counters that were still “usable”.

Then the water damage hit and we needed to replaced a wall of cabinets. We jumped on the opportunity to fix our outdated kitchen. We painted our honey oak cabinets White Dove (Sherwin Williams) and set out to DIY our counter tops with a faux granite look. We eventually want to make our own barnwood plank counter tops but we were running out of time before my due date. We opted to replace one counter with plywood (it will later be the base for the barnwood). We stained the plywood and sealed it “for now”, and intend finish the planking another day. Although I do love how the wood turned out and it is holding up GREAT!

 

As for the laminate-

I did a ton of research. Way way too much research. Every tutorial called for expensive kits, extensive sanding, special sealers, etc. I read and read and finally walked into my work room, pulled out what paint I had, and began. I was looking for a quick fix and decided to go for it with what I had on hand and suffer the consequences later. (spoiler alert:: IT WORKED OUT PERFECTLY)

 

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Supplies we used:

Liquid Sandless Deglosser

Kilz Primer (WATER based)… Most tutorials called for the oil-based version… I didn’t have that.

Various latex and acrylic craft paints I already had on hand (see photo)

Java Brown glaze

Laminate Granite Samples (just to use for reference when you are painting)

A sponge roller for the base coats

Rags, paper towels, sponges, feathers….anything to make a smudgy imperfect pattern.

Polycrylic Waterbased Sealer

 

 

First I cleaned the counters really well and wiped them down with alcohol. I then wiped them with the deglosser because I w̶a̶s̶ ̶t̶o̶o̶ ̶l̶a̶z̶y̶…err didn’t have time to sand them. Tape off your walls and cover anything that you don’t want to risk painting.

 

 

Next, roll on a coat of your Kilz primer. Let this dry really well. Your next coat is your background color. I was going for a black granite look, so I used flat black wall paint. Use whatever color you like. I did two coats but really could have gotten away with doing one.

 

I started sponging on other colors before the black dried. Be sure to work over the entire surface the whole time you are painting. Don’t concentrate too much on one area at a time. I used a lot of cream and ended up sponging over most of it with browns and grays.

 

Keep layering colors. I found the more I added the more “believable” it looked. You want a good mix of patterns. Use different textures and techniques to add depth and contrast. I used bits of paper and feathers to paint the “veining”. Plastic grocery sacks make great “sponges”, as do crumbled paper towels. Be creative!

After the veining, I let everything dry completely. I was so surprised at how realistic they came out. I was still not 100% in love with my color choices. I thought they complimented each other but it still looked too “painted”. So I used some Java Brown distressing glaze and OMGoodness… perfection achieved!

 

That’s it! I coated it with several coats of polycrylic and let her dry. We’ve been living with them for about three months now and they are holding up great! I have had to touch up a couple scratches (only because the underlying counter was white). You honestly couldn’t even notice the scratches, but I knew they were there. XD

I plan to update on how they are holding up in a few more months! This is definitely not a labor intensive project. My aunt and I tackled it in an afternoon (with a few pauses for pesky false labor). Please leave some feedback if you attempt this DIY! I definitely do NOT regret it!

-M

counters

 

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FREE Crochet Pattern Stuffed Owl Toy

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I’ve made tons of these as gifts for baby showers and Christmas. They work up so quickly that I can easily crank out several in an evening. They are endless possibilities for color combos and you could even add bells or other noise makers inside if making for an infant!

For this owl you will need:

Worsted weight yarn (I am a big fan of I Love This Yarn from Hobby Lobby)

Size G hook

Two buttons for eyes

Yarn Needle

Scissors

Stitch Markers (if desired… I’m too lazy for those.) 😉

Round 1: ch, 2. Work 8 sc in 2nd ch from hook. Sl st to first sc. (8 sc)
Round 2: ch 1, work 2 sc in same space. Work 2 sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (16 sc)
Round 3: ch 1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (16 sc)
Round 4: ch 1, sc in same space. *2 sc in next space, 1 sc in next space* around. Join to first sc. (25 sc)
Round 5: ch 1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (25 sc)
Round 6: ch 1, sc in same space. * work 2 sc in next space, work 1 sc in next 2 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (33 sc)

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Round 7: ch 1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (33 sc)

Round 8: ch 1, sc in same space. *work 2 sc in next space, work 1 sc in next 3 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (41 sc)

Round 9: ch1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (41 sc)

Round 10: ch 1, sc in same space. *work 2 sc in next space, 1 sc in next 4 space* around. Join to first sc. (49 sc)

Round 11-16: ch 1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (49 sc)

Round 17: ch 1, sc in same space. *Sc decrease, sc in next 4 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (41 st)

Round 18: ch 1, sc in same space. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (41 st)

Round 19: ch 1, sc in same space. *sc decrease, sc in next 3 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (32 st)

Round 20: ch 1, sc in same st. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (32 st)

Round 21: ch 1, sc in same space. *sc decrease, sc in next 2 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (25 st)

Round 22: ch 1, sc in same st. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (25 st)

Round 23: ch 1, sc in same space. *sc decrease, sc in next 1 spaces* around. Join to first sc. (18 st)

Round 24: ch 1, sc in same st. Sc in each st around. Join to first sc. (18 st)

Round 25: ch 1, decrease around. Join to first decrease. (8 st)

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Finish off. Stuff to desired stiffness. Stitch running stitch around opening and pull tight. Secure with a few more stitches.

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4Eyes:
Round 1: Using pupil color- ch 2, work 10 sc in 3rd chain from hook. Join to first sc. (10 st)
Round 2: ch , work 2 sc in same space and each space around. Join to first sc. (18 st)
Round 3: In second color- ch 1, sc in same space *2 sc in next space, sc in next space* around. Fasten off leaving long tail. Sew in place.5
Ears:
Cut about 20 pieces of yarn about 7 inches long. Divide and attach by folding in half and pulling through desired location with hook. Pull tails through the loop, tighten and trim.6
Wings:
Row 1- ch 6, dc in 4th chain from hook, dc in next 2 chains.
Row 2- ch 3, turn. Dc in same space, 2 dc in next space. Dc in last space.
Row 3- ch 3, turn. Dc in same space, dc decrease. Dc in last space. Finish off leaving long tail and sew on in desired location.7

From here you can embroider a beak and stitch on your button eyes! Easy huh?!

-M

owlpin

Name Applique Onesie Tutorial Using Your Silhouette Cameo

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What baby can have too many onesies? These are perfect for gifts or to make for your own little one. You can mix and match so many fun colors and patterns and embellish pretty much anything with this technique… read on for the how-to!10

You’ll need-

Small pieces of desired fabrics- I use cotton woven in fun prints and colors. The more mismatched, the better, in my book! 😉

Blank Onesie

Heat n Bond – I use the RED Heat and Bond that does not require sewing, because that is what I keep on hand. You can also use the purple sewable Heat and Bond. I have not found a problem using either kind – and I have made a ton of appliques with both!

Silhouette Cameo and mat – (SERIOUSLY MY BEST PURCHASE TO DATE!)

Scissors, sewing machine, notions, iron

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In your Silhouette program, select a font and type your name or word. I use blocky, simple fonts for easy sewing.

Trace the word using the trace feature and flip horizontally/”mirror”.Document

Your ready to cut! Smooth a piece of Heat and Bond onto your mat with the adhesive side down. The paper backing should be up. Load your mat into your Cameo.

Cut the name using the “Copy Paper” cut setting on your Silhouette.

After cutting has finished, unload the mat and peel off the excess Heat and Bond. Be careful around tight corners as it can tear easily if you peel too quickly.

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Iron each letter onto your fabric scraps in the order you want them to appear on the outfit.

Make sure when pressing you cover with a pressing cloth and let cool completely.5

Carefully cut around the edges of each letter and remove the paper backing! Your letters are ready to adhere to your outfit!

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Arrange the letters onto your onesie. Make sure they are straight and even, and then press with a pressing cloth between the outfit and iron. I’ve found it is best to press and hold for about 5-10 seconds, and then move the iron to make sure each section is covered. Repeat until all letters are well attached.

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You can stop here or move onto sewing around each letter. I use a zig-zag stitch around the edges. I love the finished but shabby look it gives the wording! You could also hand stitch or use a straight machine stitch around the edge for a different look.

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Trim extra stray strings and press one more time and you have an adorable personalized gift! These are so simple once you get the hang of this technique. You could easily applique pillow cases, quilts, tshirts, purses and more! 10

Feel free to share your projects using this technique and contact me if you have any questions! If you would like to purchase the finished onesie, you can do so here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/lillyomadesigns

-M

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